Natalie Allport https://natalieallport.com Athlete | Entrepreneur Fri, 27 Nov 2020 15:59:58 +0000 en-CA hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.3 https://natalieallport.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/cropped-favicon-32x32.png Natalie Allport https://natalieallport.com 32 32 EP 058 – Justin Rasch on animation, mindful social media use, and building your unique skillset https://natalieallport.com/justin-rasch/ https://natalieallport.com/justin-rasch/#respond Fri, 27 Nov 2020 15:59:56 +0000 https://natalieallport.com/?p=1706 Justin Rasch is an animator, director, and mover who has worked on projects such as The Spongebob movie, Coraline, Alien Xmas & more. We chat his journey as an artist, movement, social media pros and cons, and balance.

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Justin Rasch is an animator, director, and mover who has worked on projects such as The Spongebob movie, Coraline, Alien Xmas & more.

In episode 58 he discusses the impact of his athletic and movement practice on his animation, his story of becoming a high-level artist / animator and mastering his craft, as well as a deep dive into the positive and negative affects of social media – something he has personally experienced amassing nearly 1 million followers on Tiktok over the past year. Yes, he want from no social media to an insane following really really fast!⁣ ⁣

The amount of work that goes into his animations is absolutely mind blowing and you’ll respect the movies you watch much more after this interview! His passion is equally inspiring – no matter if you know anything about animation or not – there is an element of connection his passion will bring you that you can take into any element of your own life. ⁣I really enjoyed chatting with Justin and learning more about his journey and I’m sure you will too!

Tune into ALL IN with Natalie Allport on your favourite podcast / audio platform for the full interview.

Here’s a clip where Justin & I talk about the pros and cons to social media and dealing with negativity online especially when it comes to protecting your mental health and energy:

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EP 057 – Mikey Taylor on athlete retirement, building wealth, and financial freedom https://natalieallport.com/mikey-taylor/ https://natalieallport.com/mikey-taylor/#respond Fri, 20 Nov 2020 16:09:08 +0000 https://natalieallport.com/?p=1700 Mikey Taylor is a pro skateboarder turned entrepreneur, Co-Founder of Saint Archer Brewery & President of Commune Capital. He talks about his career, life after sports, mental health, entrepreneurship, building wealth and more!

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Mikey Taylor is a professional skateboarder turned entrepreneur. He is the Co-Founder of Saint Archer Brewery and President of Commune Capital.

In this episode he shares his journey in pro skateboarding, how he dealt with his untimely retirement, how mental health played into that, and the ways he planned for life after sports. He also shares tips on building wealth, real estate investing and entrepreneurship.

Tune into ALL IN with Natalie Allport on your favourite podcast / audio platform for the full interview.

Here’s a clip where Mikey talks about life after sports:

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EP 056 – Jana Webb on founding Joga, training pro athletes, & traumatic brain injury https://natalieallport.com/jana-webb/ https://natalieallport.com/jana-webb/#respond Fri, 13 Nov 2020 21:10:00 +0000 https://natalieallport.com/?p=1693 Jana is the founder of Joga - yoga for athletes and trains pro athletes in every major sport league. Learn about how she started Joga as well as her ongoing recovery from a traumatic brain injury.

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Jana Webb is the founder of Joga – yoga for athletes. She has worked with the top athletes, teams, and organizations in sport, including the NHL, NFL,  NBA, MLB, MLS, Redbull, and the Olympics. She discovered yoga after a car crash, and quickly realized the benefits of the practice of it for athletes, however there was nothing at the time that translated the yoga method into practical movements and language that athletes would uniquely understand. From there she hustled her way into working with top athletes and teams, and  into building a business that supports other trainers and practitioners worldwide.

In this episode she also opens up about a life altering car crash she experienced just years ago that caused a major brain injury which has changed her perspective on the mind and body, and affects her day to day life. 

Tune into ALL IN with Natalie Allport on your favourite podcast / audio platform for the full interview.

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EP 055 – Dawn Fletcher on mental training, fear, & discomfort https://natalieallport.com/dawn-fletcher/ https://natalieallport.com/dawn-fletcher/#respond Fri, 06 Nov 2020 17:23:18 +0000 https://natalieallport.com/?p=1686 Dawn Fletcher is the founder of Driven Mind Training, where she works as a mental performance coach for competitive athletes primarily in the sport of CrossFit, as well as other individual, team and action sports athletes.

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Dawn Fletcher is the founder of Driven Mind Training, where she works as a mental performance coach for competitive athletes primarily in the sport of CrossFit, as well as other individual, team and action sports athletes.

In this episode we dive into how she practices experiencing discomfort, the important of discomfort variability, some real talk about overcoming fear, as well as discussion the impressiveness and evolution of the mindset of top CF Games athletes such as Tia-Clair Toomey, Matt Fraser, and Katrin Davidsdottir.

Tune into ALL IN with Natalie Allport on your favourite podcast / audio platform for the full interview.

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EP 054 – Jimmy Van Ostrand https://natalieallport.com/jimmy-van-ostrand/ https://natalieallport.com/jimmy-van-ostrand/#respond Fri, 30 Oct 2020 13:56:21 +0000 https://natalieallport.com/?p=1666 Jimmy Van Ostrand is a Canadian Olympian in the sport of baseball, PAN-AM champ, and mental performance coach in the Toronto Blue Jays organization.

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Jimmy Van Ostrand is a Canadian Olympian in the sport of baseball, a (humble) PAN-AM champ, and is currently a mental performance coach in the Toronto Blue Jays organization. In this episode we chat about the 2020 MLB season, the importance of mental performance for anyone, especially its role in baseball, as well as his own athletic journey.

Tune into ALL IN with Natalie Allport on your favourite podcast / audio platform for the full interview.

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Life After Sports | Athlete Transition & Retirement https://natalieallport.com/life-after-sports/ https://natalieallport.com/life-after-sports/#respond Fri, 23 Oct 2020 14:53:25 +0000 https://natalieallport.com/?p=1647 Tips on navigating life after your sport career ends as an athlete, from pro athlete's who have done it including JJ Birden, Justin Su'a, JT Barnett & Charles Clarke.

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Tips on navigating life after your sport career ends as an athlete, from pro athlete’s who have done it. Life after sport is hard and something not often talked about – although it should be. Here are this week’s guests who share their experiences on the topic:

JJ Birden, Former NFL player & Motivational Speaker (EP 35)

Justin Su’a, Mental Performance Coach for Tampa Bay Rays (EP 31)

JT Barnett, Former Pro Hockey Player turner entrepreneur (EP 47)

Charles Clarke, Former Team USA sprinter & Motivational Speaker (EP 45)

Tune into ALL IN with Natalie Allport on your favourite podcast / audio platform for the full episode.

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Self-Confidence | Highlights from interviews with top athletes & speakers https://natalieallport.com/self-confidence/ https://natalieallport.com/self-confidence/#respond Sat, 17 Oct 2020 16:43:32 +0000 https://natalieallport.com/?p=1643 Podcast highlights on confidence from top athletes; JJ Birden, Charles Clarke, Liz Gleadle, & Carolyne Prevost.

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Highlights from past All In podcast episodes on self-confidence, from the following athletes & experts:

JJ Birden, Former NFL player & Motivational Speaker (EP 35)

Charles Clarke, Former Team USA sprinter & Motivational Speaker (EP 45)

Liz Gleadle, Track & Field Olympian, Team Canada Javelin (EP 33)

Carolyne Prevost, Pro Hockey Player, CrossFit Games Athlete (EP 39)

Tune into ALL IN with Natalie Allport on your favourite podcast / audio platform for the full episode.

Transcripts (may have errors)

JJ Birden:

You’re kind of small, maybe you should do that. And it was always like, I’m going to show you how small I am. And I would work to prove everyone wrong. And it wasn’t like to become a professional athlete. It just it just kept happening as I kept working hard and kept getting better proving people wrong. That doorway opened up. But But yeah, back in high school was when I had that first moment where I like, Okay, I’m going to show them because I was a track and field athlete. I was the number one wide receiver in the state of Oregon. I had a really good year. But when the college coaches came around to recruit football players, the D one schools just they just wrote me off. They’re like, nope, no way, no way. And I experienced enough of that, that I just I formed a plan. I thought you know what? I know I’m a D one track athlete. Because I was one of the top long jumpers in the state. I’m going to figure out how I can get on a college football team and whatever track team recruits me, I want to ask them what do you think about the trend football and now the every division one school that recruited me attracts said no, except for Oregon, Oregon, they said, you know, if you come run for the ducks, we’ll we’ll give you our blessing. And you can walk on the second year if the head coach will allow you to do it. And that’s how I needed to hear and so that second year, I I started watching the Oregon football practices during the spring, I was kind of sizing up the guys and seeing how big they were if they were that much bigger than me. And then I realized that they weren’t and I could do this. And so the next day I stood on the field, because I was waiting for the coach to kick me off. And he’s gonna know why I’m here. And sure enough, the head coach rich Brooks, he came down there, he saw me he’s like burden. You’re the track kid. What are you doing out here? And I was like, coach, I want to own play. And he’s looking at me now. I’m like, 591 50. And he’s like, I don’t know. Anyway, needless to say, I talked him into it. He said you can walk on this fall. And so I walked them for the ducks. And and I’ll tell you what, here’s a teaching point for everybody. Because that day one, there was 14 wide receivers on the depth chart. And I was number 13. So most people, when you see something like that a situation, you might start thinking, well, this is a waste of my time. They don’t even believe me. They’re not going to give me a shot, I suppose quit? Well, my mindset was like how fast can I move up the depth chart. I saw it as a challenge. And two weeks later, I was backing up to seniors and I was second string so so what I learned in that moment was that sometimes in life you have to create opportunities where appears not exist. I wasn’t recruited in football at all, but I created the opportunity I made it happen and had no idea I go and play nine years in the NFL. But when you think about that story, I created that and Oregon never recruited me so sometimes just got to do what you got to do. Once you when you get your moment you got to blast that door down.

Charles Clarke:

I think having a y gives you confidence when you go in the world to have confidence to be authentic, to be vulnerable to to go after what you’re going for, because your why is strong enough. So that’s why I think this clip is really relevant for this topic, yo, like, How can she see something that like that inside of me, somebody who’s who’s going through pain right now I’m, I’m thinking, in order for me to be respected and appreciated, I have to have success, I got to have the gold medal. So that I can write so many athletes believe, like, if I’m if I’m ever going to make something on myself, I have to be extraordinarily successful, I have to attain something. But your y is different than that. And when she told me that, she made me realize like, it’s bigger than you, Charles, at the edge of a high school auditorium stage, she realized that if I can put other people first and make myself second, this is greater than any gold medal. They know, I know, some athletes might be watching this right now. And you still might be in the sport. I’m saying to you, yeah, you can still win. You know, it’s nothing wrong with wanting to win. But put your why in front of that reason why you want to win. And when you do that, when you lose, you know, when you’re not having a good season, or you have an injury, and you got to do the rehab all over again. That was gonna keep you, you know, that that was going to sustain you and, and you’ll come out of it stronger, because we’re not going to be athletes forever. We’re going to transition Yeah. And what are you going to put in the forefront, then, if you guys, if you haven’t ever written down your why or spent time doing that kind of stuff, I highly recommend it, I try to check back in because some of those things can change slightly, I like to reevaluate making sure that all my actions and things are aligned with that y that I have.

Liz Gleadle:

I’ve done all the work, I focused myself, I’ve made the changes, I’ve said I was going to make like, you’re not going to show up with a bunch of dope because you’re going to believe in the training that you’ve done. So one of the biggest game changers for me apart from like injury prevention, especially like you’re hitting an 80 foot jump and you crash, having some muscle mass there is pretty helpful. And being able to absorb landings, all that stuff is that having that training and knowing you put in all that work actually makes you so much more competent when you get to the event. Yeah, and the thing is, too is once you do those things, and you feel really comfortable in the situations because like you’re good about your training, you’re good about your muscle mass feel good about your odds, because you know, what you’re doing is other people aren’t doing it, right? You actually cease to think about it entirely. It’s no longer like doubtful thought, No, I’m okay. It’s like you just don’t have these thoughts anymore. Which like, if you’re healthy, Nothing hurts. You’re not going to think about what if my body gets injured? It does nothing. Because you’ve been doing all your rehab, because you’ve been looking after yourself. I like that. Yeah. And it’s tiring on a game day, you have to think about all those thoughts. You’re already thinking of like, everything you need to do, right? Like imagine trying to fight everything you needed, right? And everything you did wrong. Just never no win situation. And not like I think preparing yourself, for me is partially like, you’ve already made a tangency plans, you should be on the day of thinking of like, Okay, what could go wrong? It should be like, what would this look like? If it was a great day? Right? And what would I be doing to lead up to all these like, great things? Yeah. And like, you can see it before and you can see yourself at the event doing well, oh, I messed up that one little thing, but I brush it off. Because like, I know, I’ve got like another throw to throw in like, I’ve got more chances. And I think when people kind of see it going well ahead of time. It’s super useful. So like visualizing the day of your competition, or even your practice and seeing it go well, even if it doesn’t go well. Then you’ve lived at once in your head. And if you’ve ever gone technique once or people are gone, you know, like filming another time. It’s another reference another step closer to your goal. And that’s another reason to be confident.

JJ Birden:

He’s the first person that said JJ in the NFL in the same sentence. I said uncle You’re crazy. No, you’re gonna play in the NFL. No, I’m not. Yes, you like this. I believe in you so much. I want you to promise for your first NFL test and I was like, whatever you can have it so. So he’s at that game, I come out of the locker room with the game bawling my text out and I give it to him. And I said, Oh, how did you know? And he said, you know, nephew, I need to have the ability said, but I had the poor belief into you until you got your belief to where it needed to be. And that was a really important teaching point for me. And I’ve taught other people that too, because sometimes you don’t believe in yourself, you don’t think you can get around the right people can pour that belief into you, because you’ll get your belief where it needs to be at some point.

Liz Gleadle:

You actually cease to think about it entirely. Like that was a big game changer for me when I was competing in snowboarding and something that I tried to develop a lot of young action sport athletes specifically because most of them are just like, it’s not part of the culture to be. It’s like cool to train. So a lot of them, they don’t want to go to the gym, they don’t want to work out. And so one of the biggest game changers for me apart from like injury prevention, especially like you’re hitting an 80 foot jump and you crash, having some muscle mass there is pretty helpful. And being able to absorb landings, all that stuff is that having that training and knowing you put in all that work actually makes you so much more competent when you get to the event. Yeah, the thing is, too is once you do those things, and you feel really comfortable in the situations because like you’re good about your training, you’re good about your muscle mass feel good about your odds, because you know what you’re doing if other people aren’t doing it, right, you actually cease to think about it entirely. It’s no longer like doubtful thought, no one, okay, it’s like you just don’t have these thoughts anymore.

Carolyne Prevost:

When I compare my body and compare it to the girls I compete against. I remember going to regionals, and everything I see all these like fit girls and aesthetically are just like, chiseled and I’m just like, yeah, holy crap, like, how did I make it here? I look at my body. And I don’t look like a games athlete. Like I like me, I don’t see myself looking like a games athlete. Like I don’t have the grip six pack. And I actually want to do a post about that the other day, that’s important for people to to share that also. Because I think that everyone thinks that all these games out these are these high level athletes have no body image issues. And that’s not the case, I think everyone has some extent, because at the end of the day, aesthetics is not performance. Yeah. And that’s what I’ve realized is like, it doesn’t matter. Now when I go to cops, and I look at them, and they’re bigger, bigger than me are more risks. Because if I know that my preparation was spot on, and I can compete very well, like I know I can beat them, it doesn’t matter what they look like, I just feel like when you when you put in a lot of effort towards something. And you see the performance side of it, like, you know how hard you’re working. And regardless of what you look like you’re just proud of your performance you’re proud of, of everything that you know, it’s hard to put on muscle, it’s hard to look a certain way girls can have muscles and they can look good. You know, yeah, more that girls are proud of that. And the more that people can see that see muscular girls, you become self conscious to because I would go to the grocery store and a tank top before. And I’d be like, like, I know that people would be like looking at my muscles. It’s because they don’t they’re not used to it.

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How I Deal With My Anxiety – Athlete Mental Health Story https://natalieallport.com/athlete-mental-health-anxiety/ https://natalieallport.com/athlete-mental-health-anxiety/#respond Tue, 13 Oct 2020 17:13:49 +0000 https://natalieallport.com/?p=1638 Athlete mental health is something I want to shine a light on in an effort to minimize the stigma associated with sharing your mental health story, and seeking help. In this vide I share what I have found to help with my diagnosed anxiety.

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Athlete mental health is something I want to shine a light on in an effort to minimize the stigma associated with sharing your mental health story, and seeking help. In this vide I share what I have found to help with my diagnosed anxiety.

I am not a mental health professional. Here are some crisis lines in case you or someone you know needs support right now:

-Canadian Crisis Line: 1-833-456-4566 anytime or text 45645 from 4pm to midnight

-USA Crisis Line: Text HOME to 741741 to connect with a Crisis Counselor

Audio version:

Direct from video (may contain errors):


“Hey, I was wondering if you could help me out with my anxiety, anything that you do to help?”


Okay, so we’re gonna answer this question that I just got in my Instagram DMS, I’ve been sharing more about my experience with mental health specifically with anxiety lately in 2015.

When I retired from the National snowboard team, I went through a really tough period of time dealing with and identity loss, even the physiological differences and the things that I experienced. And so I want to make a video more about what I’ve done to help because I went through that that period of time, I was diagnosed with depression and anxiety. I’m really grateful not to experience as much depression now, since I was able to get out of that time. But anxiety is something that still affects me to this day, I’m really grateful that I’ve been able to improve and work on it and be just more cognitively aware of how it affects me. And the things that I’m able to do.

I just want to start off this video, I’m going to go through like some of the things that have helped me a lot. But just I want you guys to know that I am not a mental health professional or practitioner in any means. Just take my advice or take take what I do for myself as just information, just sharing what I do, and hoping that I can de stigmatize the view of mental health in general. And before I get into more of the things that I do, I just want to talk a little bit more about why I say mental health and speaking on it is so important to me and something that I’ve been committing to speaking more on lately. And if you’re an athlete, please stick around because I know I’ll talk a little bit more about athletes specific mental health, but I think that some of this will be really relevant for everybody. So don’t don’t let me lose you. And I just specifically talked to two athletes here.

Now, why I think athlete mental health is so important is because like Lately, I’ve been seeing a lot of celebrities coming out and talking about their mental health struggles. And I think this is so important for us to realize it doesn’t matter if you’re rich, famous living this life that everyone envies or people are envying, mental health still will affect you. None of these things are going to take away your problems, having the money, having the fame having the cloud having the hype, these these things don’t help actually, in fact, they usually exasperate the problem. They are mascots are covered up and leave you with a bigger problem later on. And so I want to talk about this because I know as an athlete for myself, I felt guilty, and I didn’t want to share with people what I was going through, not necessarily because of the shame and the stigma, which is, you know, like, that’s something that we can definitely get into, but because of, of the fact that I felt like how should I be feeling like this, I’m living this life that people are telling me, you’re living your dream, you’re living everyone else’s dream, you’re, you’re traveling the world, you’re doing these things? And I was like, how, you know, what are my problems compared to the problems of other people in the world? Now the thing is, some of the world always gonna have it better than you and some of the world is always going to have it worse than you. Don’t come, let comparison determine if what you’re going through is difficult or not, literally, it’s how you’re feeling. If you’re feeling it’s difficult, it’s difficult, and it’s worth you seeking help or doing something about it, and we’re talking about it.


Don’t let the fact that other people might say, well, it’s nothing compared to what we’re going through where we have this other thing. You know, everyone deals with things differently. And so I just hope that that doesn’t hold people back from speaking out, especially when it comes to sports, in an athlete space, but really, for anyone who’s who’s dealing with something, you sharing what you’re dealing with, and being vulnerable about is going to help other people who look up to you or other people around you feel the freedom to be able to do that themselves. So it’s really strong and brave in itself of you sharing getting the help, because it helps other people be able to do the same thing.

So number one, the first thing that really, really helped me when I was first diagnosed with anxiety and depression, and just going back like I had been having panic and anxiety attacks without really knowing what they were for a long time before that. And so having this diagnosis was something that really helped me and I was able to then go and see a psychologist. And so going to therapy is definitely one of the biggest things that helped me I went to therapy every every week of that summer after I retired and retired from snowboarding. And now one cool thing that my discussed with my therapist, he was a former high level soccer player. So he really kind of understood my perspective. And that was something that I really looked for when I was looking for who to go to when it came to therapy was he talked about how physiologically some of these things were affecting the and like how I was I came from an adrenaline sport snowboarding every single day and like having to conquer fear and get myself all ramped up to going to even though I was doing fitness and you know, competing and CrossFit and things like that I didn’t have that same outlet. And so I was creating these things in my life that were you know, almost stress that I was creating myself but to wrap myself up into You know, it’s causing some of these issues, but it was a lot that was happening chemically and physiologically. And so it’s important to understand that a lot of these things might might be happening. And don’t feel weak about it happening because they’re happening chemically to to you.

Another thing is, really at that time, I didn’t want to pursue any sort of medication. And so after that summer, I actually ended up spending every dollar I had and flew to Bali by myself for a month. And I had a whole period of self discovery, I felt like you know, a lot of things in my life I was doing for other people, always worrying about other people. It made me stressed in every moment, I can never be present in different moments, because I felt like I was trying to make sure the other person who was around me was having a good time or, you know, just things like that. So being alone for a month was something I needed, like a foreign country I’d never been to completely on the other side of the world was like, huge for me. I know, even when I told my parents I was going they were worried what if I had these panic or anxiety attacks when I was there. And somehow I you know, I managed not to my therapist assured them though, he thought it was actually a great idea. And so I was able to do that. And then I came back, I had like good digital on meditation practice, things like that when I was there, and felt like this hi from being there. And then eventually, it wore off. And even though I was continuing with these practices, I felt like still I was dealing with this daily anxiety. And so I ended up from the recommendation of my doctor going on an SSRI, which is a selective serotonin was, I’m gonna have to look up for again, what that means. But basically, it’s kind of like an antidepressant, and anti anxiety medication. And I was really lucky, I was on a low dose. And it really, really did help me out. I actually took it for a month without telling my family to try to see if they could see the difference. And they actually started telling you Yeah, you seem really happy and more present and all these things. And it was cool to see. They saw the difference without knowing that I was taking it. So that’s something that helped me I’ve been off it for a little bit over a year, the withdrawal was horrible. But it’s definitely something to speak to your doctor to I wouldn’t recommend or not recommended as totally a personal decision.


But yeah, the other thing is, so like I discussed meditation, meditation was huge. Trying to stick to it. I noticed on the days that I skipped my meditation because I think I’m too busy. That always leads to me having some sort of anxiety or maybe a couple days later, my anxiety attack gets worse. I may have one reoccurring anxiety attack because I haven’t been taking the time to myself, I’ve just been overworking myself, which leads me into I mentioned doing stuff just for fun, not just valuing yourself off your productivity, knowing that you’re more than your productivity, your your your presence, judge your day on your product, not on your productivity, but on your level of presence in the day. And so for me, it’s like this gap between expectations and I’m like I need to be doing doing doing. And that leads me to anxiety when I realize all of a sudden these things that don’t give me anxiety. So I’m just chilling out. And, and just being present in the moment enjoying coffee on the deck, like going down biking when I’m really present in the moment. And so just doing things for fun, having hobbies, things that aren’t leading and having to have this expectation as big goal around them is a great way to get yourself more present and focused in the moment.

Another thing that I did is I actually took out a sheet of paper and journaled with two lists. And one side was all things that give me anxiety. And another side was all things that bring me like calm and peace and sense of mine. And so I wrote down every little thing like laying on the dock under the sun. You know, like that feeling when you’re driving, to go play a sport and you’re so excited, or driving to go see your dog like listening to your favorite song like all those little things. And then all the things that then give me anxiety. And what I noticed was all those things were little moments and like things that really forced you into the present moment. And so being present is so important, which is why meditation and practice like that is important. Now on the flip side of things that gave me anxiety or give me anxiety always comes from expectations. Now there’s also physical things like I know, if I don’t exercise for a couple days, I usually get anxiety and I know because physically I need to have that strict controlled stress response of training and training hard if I’ve just trained like barely moving for a few days, I still unfortunately I get it and that just physiologically with me something that I need to really burn off my energy. Otherwise I have this anxious energy that I haven’t burned off and it outlets itself and not the greatest way sometimes. So that’s a key for me.

Also, just making sure I’m eating frequent meals and things like that. I know when my blood sugar gets low, or I’m hangry I get really anxious. So just keeping in mind stuff like that things like doing sauna, ice baths, stuff like that is a great way to trigger your stress response similar to like a workout, but in a controlled way where you’re dealing with stress, you’re actually being stronger at dealing with the stress mentally and physically, which can help you overcome stress in other ways.

So yeah, so I just noticed that the differences between the two Besides the things that I should be doing more of, and making sure that I’m present in those moments when I am doing those things, and then the flip side of like, it’s always this expectations needing to be constantly on. So making sure that you’re turning off at the end of the workday, having this time to yourself, where you’re not having expectations on yourself, no big goals surrounded by what you’re doing, just doing things for fun, I think is really important. Another thing is being open with those around you so that you can set the boundaries like being open with the relationships that are that matter to you, that are close to you, and that are affected by your anxiety, so that you don’t feel like you’re letting people down, knowing just letting them know like, this is what I’m going through. And sometimes they may react like this, just be aware of it, or telling them what to do. So that if they see you having dealing with anxiety, having an anxiety attack or things like that, they know how to respond. And they can respond in a way that you don’t set out any judgment or anything around that they feel safe doing so and you feel safe around them. That’s really important. So you’re not hiding it.

Lastly is journaling and just taking time to check in. I think that’s that’s really important. Just checking in with yourself every once in a while and taking that time for yourself just to be chill and do nothing or to reflect and just look at some of the things that you’re doing in your day that are contributing are not contributing to your happiness to your well being to your anxiety. So just to end things off again, I am not a mental health or medical professional. I will put some lines like crisis lines in the in the description. Hopefully that can help you guys and lead you in the right direction. And feel free to leave a comment if this is something that you experienced too, or you deal with. I think that mental health especially when it comes to athletes, but in general, it’s something that we should talk more about and be more open and sharing about because the more vulnerable I’ve been, the more my relationships have improved. And so I think that’s really important.

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The ‘Original Story’ Salescast Podcast https://natalieallport.com/salescast-podcast/ https://natalieallport.com/salescast-podcast/#respond Tue, 06 Oct 2020 17:48:45 +0000 https://natalieallport.com/?p=1632 Original Story by Salescast podcast hosted by Christopher Decker. Chatting about how I launched my podcast & business + building & growing your brand.

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Recently I was on the Original Story by Salescast podcast hosted by Christopher Decker. In this podcast I chatted about how I came to launch my podcast and business, as well as great value on building and growing your brand.

Intro from the podcast: Former professional snowboarder (Canadian National Team member for 4 seasons), competitive athlete, and lifelong entrepreneur. After partnering with global brands throughout her athletic career, She launched a digital marketing agency, 93 Agency, to help businesses, brands, and individuals harness the power of social media to build their brands.

If you’re interested in checking it out, here’s the episode:

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Building Your Brand As An Athlete | Part 2 https://natalieallport.com/athlete-branding-2/ https://natalieallport.com/athlete-branding-2/#respond Fri, 02 Oct 2020 14:36:18 +0000 https://natalieallport.com/?p=1627 Podcast highlights on athlete marketing, personal branding, & social media with elite athletes / experts; Lucas Parker, Malcolm Lemmons, JT Barnett, Dr. Thilo Kunkel & more.

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Highlights from past All In podcast episodes on athlete marketing, personal branding, and social media, from the following athletes & experts:

Dr. Thilo Kunkel – PhD Sports Management, Professor in sports business and athlete branding expert (EP 43)

Lucas Parker – Multi-time Crossfit games athlete (EP 32)

Baily McDonald – Canadian Snowboard Athlete & Youth Olympian (EP 34)

Malcolm Lemmons – Former pro basketball player, entrepreneur, author (EP 44)

JT Barnett – Former pro hockey player, entrepreneur, influencer (EP 47)

Tune into ALL IN with Natalie Allport on your favourite podcast / audio platform for the full episode.

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